Polo T-Shirt Quilt

Good Afternoon!  It is my #1 son’s birthday today:). Happy Birthday!!  A few months ago, as I was cleaning out his room making space for my quilting machine, I came across his old counselor shirts from working at our church’s youth camp. He had quite a bright collection of them.:)

I knew immediately that these could not be thrown out or given away.  It was T-shirt Quilt time to be sure:)!


I fussy cut around the embroidery by placing a small cutting mat inside of the shirt and rotary cutting around it.  I used my Quilt in a Day 4.5″ fussy cut ruler.  A fussy cut ruler makes the cutting easy! 

I cut the logo, saved the buttons, cut the inside logo, and cut the shirt.  The shirt I cut into strips to use as the logs for the square.   

Now, the problem with T-shirt quilts is that the fabric is very stretchy so it needs to be stabilized.  This part takes time and a lot of iron on interfacing.  If you decide to make a t-shirt quilt, please please don’t forget this step.  You will be sorry if you do.  You will have a wonky quilt in the end.

  • I find it easy to lay my interfacing with the sticky side up on my ironing board and then lay my pieces right side up on top of it.
  • Place a paper towel over all of the piece and iron away.
  • Peel the paper towel off 
  • Magic! All of my pieces are stabilized!

To make things even stronger, I cut some old, scratchy fabric that I save just for backing stabilizer into 14.5″ squares.   I wish I would have cut them into 16″ squares because no mater how straight and centered I get the center square, in the end they seem to be a bit off and hang off the end.   So next time I will remember to cut my square bigger and trim down in the end.

  • I pressed the center mark of my fabric, 
  • Put some glue in the center
  • Placed the center square on top.

As you can see in the photo, I went around the embroidery square with a 1″ black strip to add an accent to it.   I used a knit here, but wish I would have used a quilting cotton.   Live and learn, right?


I stitched and flipped my log strips around my center square.  Every now and then I added another 1″ black round to give an added dimension and a bit of wonkiness to this fun, active quilt. I moved this round to different places on the different squares.


I always love the squaring up part of a stitch and flip stabilized block.  Pretty!!

I sashed the blocks with black and a colored corner stone.  

I love all of the bright colors!  I even stitched the buttons on!  

He had 12 shirts, so there are twelve sets of buttons.  Yep, it must be love because I had sewed 36 buttons on a quilt in the Arizona summer!  


It was worth it though.  I really like how they look, how they add another dimension to the quilt, and how I used every part of the shirts..  These are some really cute buttons!


I used the inside logo as an accent on the back.  How cute is that?!


I really like how this quilt turned out.  And while my son does not NEED another quilt,  I know he is going to love it:)❤️.   

Thank you so much for stopping by and sharing in my creative journeys. I hope you have a SWEET rest of your day:)!

Almost Gone – Long Time Gone Quilt

It was so exciting to see this quilt come together today:)!   It was sewn together in six sections.  And it’s a good thing because the blocks are all different sizes.  It was kind of like sewing a puzzle together in sections!

Section 1-

Section 2-

Section 3-

Section 4-

Section 5-

Section 6-

Isn’t that crazy?!  I love sewing different sized blocks together.  It adds so much dimension to the quilt.  I think that is why I like all of Jen Kingwell’s patterns in the first place:)

And here it is all sewn together–



Yea!!!!  Next I added the border–


Not so yea:(   It is funny what a picture will tell you about your color placements. The black has got to go.  Here is another-


Yep, it’s coming out!  But not today because I am heading over to my daughter’s for a fun file folder coloring retreat.  I will definitely post about the fun:)!

Until then, have a super SWEET day!!


P.S.–  if any of you are interested in making this quilt, it is from a pattern booklet I bought online called Long Time Gone by Jen Kingwell. 😊

Scrap Happy Bag

Hello!  It is that Scrap-Happy time of the month again:)!  I always love linking up with Kate over at Tall Tales from Chiconia and seeing what fun creations everyone is making from their scraps:)

I helped my daughter in law make a beautiful quilt for her new baby boy.  She cut, sewed, and then cut and sewed again.  It turned out wonderfully!After it was all sewn together, there were quite a few beautiful fabric strips leftover.

I can’t throw lovely fabric away, so I decided to gather them up and make a matching bag for her.


I have had this bag pattern in my file for years.  Now seemed like the perfect time to use it:)


I sewed the scraps into strips and then quilted them to a backing.


Looking good so far!   I followed the pattern to construct the bag and then came to the grommet section.  I used Dritz curtain grommets that I bought at Walmart but you can get them on Amazon as well. 

  • There was a template to mark the fabric.  
  • I traced the circle
  • Pinned my fabric together to keep it from shifting as I cut
  • I took a DEEP breath and cut this large hole into my bag.  Eeeeek!!  That was scary!!
  • I snapped the grommet in place. 

Woo hoo!  They look GREAT!!  Some of the grommets were easier to snap together than others.  There is a lot of fabric in there!  But they all came together:)The bag turned out so cute!!  I really love the large grommets.  


I even used scraps to make an inside pocket to hold bottles or a phone.


Here is the matching set.  SWEET!!  They look so good together:). I probably need to make another one for me!

I hope you have a Scrap Happy Day!

Long Time Gone Quilt — Almost Done!!

Good Monday morning!  I am back from a few days at the cabin for a family reunion.  It was so nice to spend time with family in the cooler weather of Northern Arizona:)

Now that I am back, I have had time to finish the checkerboard blocks for my Long Time Gone Quilt. They were so quick and fun to make!   I loved using my leftover scraps to whip them out:)

I listened to a book as I sewed and chain pieced away:).  It is kind of therapeutic to sew and listen to a book.  It is one of life’s greatest pleasures!


My handy Cutting Gizmo made light work of cutting apart the chains. 


Ah, the beauty of a finished section:)!


I stacked all of my finished blocks together and just looked at them with a happy smile on my face:) :). I just love neatly stacked quilting blocks, don’t you?


And here they are laid out in no particular order.  They are ready to be sewn together this week.  I can’t believe it!  This quilt is almost done.  It is soon to be Long Time Gone….

This quilt is made from the Long Time Gone Quilt pattern by Jen Kingwell.  I am using a mix of Cotton and Steele fabrics and fabrics from my stash.  Sewing along with the Gnome Angel sew along has kept me on a schedule that has really helped.

I hope your day is a SWEET one filled with people you love and time for a creative adventure or two!

Learn to Quilt – Lesson 7 -Finish and Photo Shoot!

It’s a wonderful day because today is the finishing of our Pins and Stripes quilting lessons!  Yea!!   This lesson is going to take you several days or even longer.  Don’t stress.  Just enjoy the journey and take it one step at a time.  It’s all good:)


In our last lesson, we finished the borders all around out quilt top.  It looks so pretty, but really, it isn’t a quilt yet.  We need to prepare a back, gather our batting, sew it together, and bind it. Wow! There is a lot to a quilt!

First, let’s talk about our backing. Your backing should measure at least 8″ wider and longer than your top.  This is  to make sure that it still covers the whole quilt after quilting.

You can buy 108″ backing fabric at your local fabric store.  Or you can piece together fabric until it large enough to be bigger than your top.


This is my backing.  I didn’t have enough of the checked fabric in my stash so I added the stripe.  I really like how it looks.  Quilters make do!

  • If you are using  42″ wide fabric, you will need to have 5 yards of fabric.
  • Cut this piece in half making two pieces of fabric 2.5 yards each
  • Sew them together lengthwise making sure to cover the entire selvedge in your seam. You will need to make a 5/8″ seam to do this instead of our normal 1/4″.
  • Iron out all of the wrinkles and press your seam open.

Now for the quilting.  I highly, highly, highly recommend taking your beautiful quilt to a longarm quilter in your area and having them quilt it .

You will get a perfectly backed, fun stitched, no headache quilt in return.  Once again, your local quilt shop can direct you to several quilters in your area.

But if you want to save the money or the packing up of your stuff and heading to the store again, I get it, I have been there too:).   Here is how you can quilt it at home.  You are going to need a lot of safety pins or fabric spray glue.

  • Lay your backing with the right side down or the wrong side facing up on a large hard surfaced floor.
  • With your masking tape, tape it down all the way around
  • Lay your batting on top.  If you are spray basting, spray the backing first and then lay the batting down on top
  • Lay the quilt top on top of the batting.  Once again, spray the batting first if you are spray basting.
  • If you are pinning, now pin through all three layers at the center of every block.
  • Lift your quilt off of the floor and take it to your machine
  • Stitch in the ditch around all of the squares.  Sew one straight line all the way down
  • Repeat for all of the rows, go one direction, then other.

You can add as much quilting as you like.  Just keep sewing in all of the seams:)


Now that our quilt is quilted, the final step is the binding.   Don’t worry, it isn’t hard.  This method is easy! Just remember to take it slow, one step at a time:)

When you get your quilt back, it will look like this:

  • Cut the batting and the backing even with the top.
  • Use your ruler to square up the corners and straighten the edges.
  • Sew 1/4″ all the way around your quilt to keep the edges together as we bind.  Nothing is more frustrating than a shifty bottomed quilt that doesn’t get caught in the binding.
  • From the remaining blues or color #2, cut 8 strips 2.5″ wide.  If you are using smaller lengths, you need 310″ or so.
  • Take all of these strips to your machine.
  • Place one strip horizontally on your table. Place a second strip on top going vertically.  Be sure to match the edges.
  • Sew from the top left corner to the bottom right corner.  Use your masking tape from before as your sewing guide.
  • Chain sew the next piece and the next in the same manner
  • Keep sewing them all together until you have one REALLY long  2.5″ strip.
  • Trim all of the extra fabric at the seam down to 1/4″
  • Press the seams open and cut off all of the little dog ear pieces hanging below the edges.
  • Press your entire strip in half
  • Starting sewing in the middle of a long edge on the back side of your quilt.  Place your folded fabric strip on the edge with the raw edges together. Leave a 12″ tail at the top.  Start sewing with your 1/4″ foot where I have marked with the pin.
  • Sew all the way down the side of the quilt until a little before  1/4″ of the end.  Your presser foot should have a 1/4″ mark on it like in the above picture. Stop sewing a little before that mark reaches the edge of your quilt.
  • Cut your threads and raise your presser foot,
  • Place the edge of your quilt on a straight lined surface.  I use the edge of my machine.  You may need to use your cutting mat if you have a round edged machine.
  • Fold the binding back so it is also on the straight edge of your surface going the opposite direction creating a perfect 45 degree angle fold as in the top left picture above
  • Hold that angled piece as you fold the binding back on itself.  Hold it tight and turn it so you can start sewing down the next side.
  • Sew about 3 inches down, cut your threads and check your corner by flipping it over. It should be nice and crisp. If it isn’t, take out the stitching and start again.  3″ isn’t too hard to fix:).
  • If it looks good,  continue to sew and repeat the same process on the remaining three sides
  • Sew until you are about 12″ away from your beginning stitch.  Back stitch and cut your threads.
  • Take your quilt to a large flat surface like your cutting mat.
  • Fold both ends of your binding back on themselves leaving about 1/4″ space between them.
  • Cut the left piece at this fold
  • Open the piece you just cut and lay it on top of the right piece.
  • Use this as your measurement to cut the top folded part of the right binding. Do not cut through all four pieces of fabric. Only cut the top two pieces leaving a folded piece of binding.
  • Fold the left side of the binding on an angle as in the top left picture.  Really finger press that angle.
  • Place the right binding on to the left side
  • Open the right binding and really hold it there.
  • This next part feels a little awkward, but it’s not too hard, you can do this:)! — while holding the edges together, lift both pieces of binding up and pin them together.
  • Your quilt will feel heavy, but hold that pinned piece together and bring it back to your machine.
  • Bunch your quilt up to the left and sew on the mark you created by finger pressing.   Sew from the top left to the bottom right corner. Use your tape as your guide:)
  • Check to make sure your binding now fits your quilt, and then trim the excess corner off with your scissors.
  • Sew the final 12″ of your binding down to your quilt.
  • Change your threads.  The bobbin thread should match your backing fabric and the top thread should match your binding.   They might be two different colors.  Mine are.
  • Starting in the middle of one side, fold your binding over to the right side of your quilt.  You do not have to fold the entire binding over, just a few inches.
  • Make sure the binding is covering the stitching, and start to sew.  Use the left inside edge of your presser foot as the guide for the placement of the edge of your binding.
  • As you sew, the top of the binding will have a cute little edge stitch and the bottom of your quilt will have stitching that blends into the backing fabric.  Easy!
  • Sew all the way to the edge of your quilt.  Stop right at the edge.
  • Fold the binding up to make a perfect mitered corner.  Just look at your pretty corner ! And how simple was that?!
  • Continue sewing all the way around your quilt repeating the corner technique.

DONE!!  You have finished your quilt!!!  Isn’t it beautiful?!  You deserve a fun photo shoot! And how about a picnic?   SWEET!!

Thank you so much for joining in on this quilting journey.  You are now equipped with the necessary tools and skills to make many more quilts.  I warn you, quilting is quite addictive:)!

If any of you are just joining us, you can find the previous lessons here:

I hate to say goodbye to this fun adventure, but I am sure we will sew together again.

Until next time,

Don’t forget to post your finished Quilt on Instagram #pinsandstripesqal I will be giving away a jelly roll to someone who posts a picture from all seven lessons and a picture of themselves with their new quilt by the end of July 2017!!  Be sure to check that all of your pictures are in the file:)

Delilah Block #4 – Fairhaven

It is always a happy day when my Jen Kingwell Delilah QAL Templates and fabric come in each month!  I eagerly open the envelope, and drink in the pretty fabrics.  I read the instructions at least twice and then try to wait until I can relax a bit and get started.  

But this time I was so excited to get started that I didn’t wait to take a picture of all of my pretty fabrics.  Oh well, as you can see, they make up into a beautiful block!

The hardest part was deciding what colors I wanted to put where:). Isn’t that always the case?

The cutting was also no easy task this month.  There were a lot of curves all over the place!  I just focused on one square at a time.  It was easier that way:)

I tried my hand at hand sewing a few of the curves, but gave up. Nope, that was not for me.   I much prefer my sewing machine.

With just a little tug here and there, the curves just magically sew together.  And look how pretty they turn out!


Those striped convex pieces in the middle just make me smile:)


I just love them!:)

Thank you for dropping by and reading my blog. I will be back to tomorrow with our final Learn to Quilt Lesson – Pins and Stripes.  SWEET!!

Until tomorrow,


Learn to Quilt -Lesson #6 – Borders

It has been so fun watching this quilt come together.  I am absolutely LOVING it!  I hope you are too:)

Last time we ended with all of our blocks all sewn together. Those pinwheels are just the cutest things!

Today we are going to add a border all around.  Gather your leftover blue or color #2 fabric.  We are going to cut 3.5″ strips out of it.  At first I used the lighter blue as in the above picture, but took it out because it detracted from the pins.  So word of advice, keep your border dark or all the same color:)

You can cut your 3.5″ strips all from one color, or make your border scrappy by using what you have.  That’s what I did.  Cut 8 – 3.5″ strips if you are cutting the full width of the fabric, or about 300″ if you are using scraps .  Take them to your sewing area.

We are going to sew them all together into one long strip.  Sew them together by butting the ends together for a straight join.

Just sew the short end of two pieces right sides together, and press

Now we need to measure our quilt. — Please don’t ever skip the measuring part of adding a border.  If you just start sewing your long border strip around your quilt, you will end up with a wavy border and a wavy edged quilt.

Ok. The pictures I took of the folding of the fabric didn’t look like anything but a piece of fabric. So I will try to be clear with directions

  1. Fold your quilt in half.
  2. With a tape measure or your ruler measure the folded part of your quilt.  In other words, measure the length of the fold, this is the middle of the short side or the long side of your quilt.
  3. Cut two pieces of your long fabric strip to this size
  4. Fold one strip in half and place a pin to mark the center. Fold it in half again and place pins to mark those centers as well.  So… we are dividing our strip into quarters.  Do the same with the other strip.
  5. Now divide the edges of your quilt into quarters the same way.   Make sure you are working with the sides that you measured your strips for — long sides or short sides. Fold the edge your quilt in half and then in half again.  Mark  the quarters with a pin.
  6. Place your border strip on your quilt with the right sides together.
  7.  Pin them together where you marked the quarters.  This is VERY important!  If you don’t match these points, your edges will not match in the end.  Believe me, I know from experience, and then you have to become well acquainted with your seam ripper!
  8. Sew the pieces together using your 1/4″ foot.  Hold the pins and remove them just before they get to the foot.  You may need to pull slightly on the pin as you sew if your fabric is a little longer in the bottom than the top.   The feed dogs will do the work of taking up the extra ease.
  9. Press the border strip open and repeat for the other side.  Yea! Now we have two of our borders sewn on!
  10. Repeat steps 1-9 for the other sides of the quilt.


Woo hoo!!!  Our quilt top is finished!!!  Aren’t you proud of yourself?  You should be:)

I am excited for our quilting, binding, and grand finish next time along with a SWEET photo shoot!

Until then:)

If any of you are just joining us, you can find the previous lessons here:

Don’t forget to post pictures of your fabric and progress on Instagram #pinsandstripesqal I will be giving away a jelly roll to someone who posts a picture from all seven lessons and a picture of themselves with their new quilt by the end of July 2017!!

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