Delilah Blocks 2 & 3

I have really been enjoying this monthly QAL by Jen Kingwell.   I was lucky enough to find a quilt shop with a few open spaces  back in February.  I’m so glad I did.  This quilt is going to be awesome!!

Each month I receive the templates and fabric to make an advanced piecing block.  The templates really help to make the cutting and the piecing easier.  

In fact, this month”s Star Blocks are so precise that they look paper pieced even without the paper!

I like this one so much, I might make a bunch of them someday and make a one block quilt.  Is it possible for me to make a quilt with only one block?  Lol:)

Here is a close up of those pretty points.

Last month’s Bells blocks introduced some fun curve techniques and a few mitered corner challenges.  Bring it on!

I carefully cut my fabric using the templates, placed them all on one of my preview boards, and took them to my machine


Curves really aren’t as hard you may think. If you gently guide the fabric making sure the centers match, the block magically curves all by itself.  

At first it looks like a mess, but a quick press of the iron brings all of the fabric back down revealing a beautifully curved block:)

The mitered corners are a little more tricky.  First you fold the whole block in half diagonally and then start to sew on the pre cut diagonal border.

The most important part is stopping exactly at the previous stitching in the bottom.  I like to stop just a stitch above that corner to make sure I don’t create a pucker.  

Really, it is not difficult at all once you get the hang of it.  And look at how pretty those mitered corners turn out!

These blocks are simply beautiful.  Thank you Jen Kingwell for designing them!


I’m so happy you took the time to stop by and read my blog.  I hope you have a super SWEET day!!

Baby Blessing Set Done

I am expecting two grandsons in just a few weeks. One will be here at the end of this month and one will be here in June.  I have been busily crocheting and sewing away trying to get everything ready.  I can happily say that I am now done:).  Yea!!

I am very pleased with how the afghan turned out. (One family already has a blessing afghan) The cute little holes are just perfect for little fingers to poke through. 

I didn’t have a pattern.  I just alternated rows of  1 row dc and and 1 row 3dc in same st, skip 2 sc,repeat. It was very fast.  After the Tunisian blankets, I was happy for fast:)

I also tackled two boy blessing outfits.  Oh my, oh my, they turned out cute!    I searched online for a ready made outfit that I liked , but I couldn’t find one.  So I searched for patterns.  It took hours, but I finally found a vintage pattern that looked just right.  

It arrived in a tattered envelope, but the pattern was all intact, Butterick 5758.  I redesigned it a little by sewing the shorts and shirt together to eliminate gaps and bulk at the waist.   Isn’t it ADORABLE?!


I was going to make a matching bow tie, but it seemed to detract from the outfit.  I guess I’ll wait and ask the mother’s what they want.  

Sewing from a vintage pattern was a little tricky because the instructions were not as clear as modern patterns, but it was still a fun adventure:). I’m glad I did it..


I am so ready to meet these two SWEET little boys.  They have already stolen my heart, before I have even met them!  

Totally Tipster- How to Organize a Button Box

Hello!  It’s a Totally Tipster day around my house today.  I have been making blessing outfits for my grand babies, and came to the button part of the pattern.   Oh no, ugh! —  this is always such a chore because my button box looks like this:

Come on, I know that most of yours look very similar to this as well:).  Now, I like the look of a button jar or the feel of running buttons through my fingers, but this is not a decorative button box.  It is supposed to be a working button box.

I dug around looking for matching small white buttons for about 30 minutes, and finally said, “Enough already!! It’s time to fix this!”I took out a package of large safety pins that I had in a drawer and got to work.

I divided the buttons by color and then started pinning button sets on pins.   It really didn’t take that long, and they look so pretty!

Not every button had a matching set, so I left those  alone in the box for single button projects.   

I just love LOVE LOVE how easy it is to find buttons now!  Pick a colored pin and off I go:)!  SWEET!!

I hope this Totally Tipster Tip helps some of you get your button collection under control too.  Please feel free to leave  me a comment if you do:)!

Until tomorrow–


 

Scrap Happy Maple Leaf Rag Quilt

It is the 15th of the month which means it is time to link up with Kate @ Tall Tales from Chiconia on her  Scrap Happy Link up party:).   I really would not get anything done on this quilt if it weren’t for this party.  Thank you again Kate!  She is so nice

This month I sewed a few of my pieced blocks together.  I gathered my strip triangles and my crazy pieced winged triangles and took a deep breath to get started.

I laid the quilt out and started placing the pieces into octagonal shapes.  I started sewing, taking care to leave the final edge of the seams open so I could get the angles to make squares.  Yes, it was and is tricky!

Even with my careful planning, I managed to sew a striped piece to the wrong wing and sewed it all together without noticing.  Ugh!

I had to take out my good friend, Triagan, the seam ripper, and un-sew that whole section.  Oh well,  these things do happen.  Sewing, un-sewing, it’s all part of the process:). 

Here is another pretty octagon that I laid out and then pinned together in hopes of not getting lost this time.

Whew!  It worked better that way:).  I am so excited to see this quilt come together.  It is definitely scrappy happy:)  Look at that uber scrappy star between the octagons–AMAZING !

The pattern can be found in the book Material Obsession 2 by Kathy Doughty.  It definitely isn’t for a beginner quilter, it is tricky to be sure. But I think it is worth the time and effort. I love the kaleidoscopic effect of all of these little scraps:)

I hope your day is SWEET with creative projects!  Thank you for stopping by:) 

Until tomorrow,


 If you have a moment or two, you might want to go check out what the other Scrap Happy participants are sewing together.

 

Quilt Time for My Splendid Sampler!

It’s on the rollers and being quilted!!! I can’t believe it:)!  Can you tell I am excited?  I don’t  want this to be a bed sized quilt.  I am going to hang it on the wall in a place of honor in my quilting room, right where it should be:).

To keep it smaller, I did not add any sashing.  But, I did add about 375 flying geese as a double border (it was a great way to use some of the scraps:). It measures 70″x70″.

I made sure to sew around the outside edge to keep those geese from flying away when I put them on the quilt machine.

Now it’s QUILT TIME!! I think I’m a bit trepidatious about this as well.  There are a lot of choices that will need to be made for each block–“I think I can,  I think I can!”

The next time I post about this, it will be for a photo shoot:)!  SWEET!!

Thank you for dropping by,  

Ouch!

I have been trimming and trimming and trimming all day, my hands hurt!  You would think it would be just the rotary cutter hand, but even the ruler hand is hurting.

Okay, maybe I sound a bit whiney, or probably a lot bit whiney, but hey, I made 350 flying geese today!   My eyes are blurry and my head is kind of fuzzy.  I only kept working because I didn’t want to do them tomorrow.If I would have just used the stitch and flip method, I could have saved hours of time not to mention my hands!  But no…I  decided to use my Wing Clipper ruler because there is very little waste with this method, and I am at the bottom of my fabrics.

I really do like this ruler.  It makes perfect flying geese.  You get 4 flying geese out of each square.  It gives the cutting measurements and the trimming guides.  They start by looking like hearts.  These will be two geese.

It was easy to sew the square down 1/4″ from the center on both sides using my Lori Holt seam measuring flower marker.  But it is easy and accurate to mark the lines as well.

Then the handy ruler gives the trim guides.  I put the valley in the v lines of the ruler on the 3.5″ marks.  Then I turned the block over to the mountain side and lined it up and trimmed again

And voila! The perfect flying geese block.  Gorgeous!  It’s funny how these kind of appear out of nothing..  They take more time than the stitch and flip, but there are only  little slivers of waste here.

So… yea!  I am excited to have these geese ready for the border of my Splendid Sampler.  The pain is worth it:). They look great!  

I hope your quilting adventures are SWEET and happy …. without any rotary cutting pain:)  Lol!

Long Time Gone SAL week #3

I found a little bit of sewing time this past Saturday as I listened to the General Conference of our church online.  It was a very enjoyable day. 

I am quilting along with Gnome Angel as we sew the Long Time Gone Quilt by Jen Kingwell.  It is so fun!  These little Crosses of the U.K. blocks just stitched right up.  Aren’t they cute?

It took longer just choosing my fabrics and cutting them out than sewing them together.  I cut the fabric to the specified sizes in the pattern and then put them all in block groups  on my preview board.

Here is how I sewed them up.–


I marked the center of the triangles and sewed them to each side of the long triangle.  I pressed them open and squared them up.

Isn’t that easy?  Now I laid the block out and sewed them up.

The block is adorable!!  Here is another:)

There is nothing like a SWEET day of sewing:). God bless you and happy sewing!